Insinuator


Some outright rants from a bunch of infosec practitioners.

Jan/16

28

Dynamic IDA Enrichment (aka. DIE)

Last year on the Hex-rays plugin Contest the Dynamic IDA Enrichment (DIE) plugin won first place, so we decided to have a look and play around with it.

DIE extends IDA to add Dynamic Data to the static analysis. So after the installation, we are able to perform the static analysis using a lot of supporting information from the actual execution of the binary under assessment.

Since DIE is purely written in Python you will need at least Python 2.7 and IDA Versions prior to 6.8 won´t work. In the current version DIE will only work on Windows which will hopefully soon be available cross-platform.

To setup the environment for DIE just use pip install –r requirements.txt (requirements.txt are shipped with DIE).
Copy die_proxy.py to the IDA Plugin directory and add an environment Variable named DIEDIR including the path to the DIE directory. (more…)

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In the last few years, attack techniques which fall in the categories of “Credential Theft” or “Credential Reuse” have grown into one of the biggest threats to Microsoft Windows environments. Microsoft has stated more than one time, that nearly almost all of their customers that run Active Directory have experienced “Pass-the-Hash” (PtH) attacks recently.[1] Once an attacker gains an initial foothold on a single system in the environment it takes often less than 48 hours until the entire Active Directory infrastructure is compromised. To defend against this kind of attacks, a well-planned approach is required as part of a comprehensive security architecture and operations program. As breach has to be assumed[2], this includes a preventative mitigating control strategy, where technical and organizational controls are implemented, as well as preparations against insider attacks. This is mainly achieved by partitioning the credential flow in order to firstly limit their exposure and secondly limit their usefulness if an attacker was able to get them. Although we spoke last year at Troopers 15 about “How to Efficiently Protect Active Directory from Credential Theft & Large Scale Compromise”[3], we would like to summarize exemplary later in this post Active Directory pentest findings that we classified in four categories in order to better understand what goes typically wrong and thus has to be addressed. For a better understanding of the overall security goals, we classified the findings as to belonging as a security best practice violation of the following categories: (more…)

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Jan/16

26

Web Hacking Special Ops Workshop @ TR16

Trooper!

You passed Hacking 1on1 with flying colors?

You evade web application firewalls as they would be opened doors?

You have successfully exploitated CVE-2015-8769?

Then it’s time for the next challenge! Follow us down the rabbit hole to the not so well known attacks against modern web applications.
(more…)

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Jan/16

25

Hacking 101 Training at TROOPERS16

This year’s Hacking 101 workshop at TROOPERS16 will give attendees an insight into the hacking techniques required for penetration testing. These techniques will cover various topics like information gathering, network mapping, vulnerability scanning, web application hacking, low-level exploitation and more.

During this workshop you will learn, step by step, a testing methodology that is applicable to the majority of scenarios. So imagine you have to assess the security of a system running on the Internet. How would you start? First, you need a good understanding about the target, including running services or related systems. Just scanning an IP will most likely not reveal a lot of information about the system. The gathered information may help you to identify communication relations of services that could include vulnerabilities. A brief understanding of the target and it’s related systems/services/applications will make scanning and identifying vulnerabilities a lot easier and more effective. Then, the last step will be the exploitation of the identified vulnerabilities, with the ultimate aim to get access to the target system and pivot to other, probably internal, systems and resources.

So if you are interested in learning these techniques and methodologies, join us at the TROOPERS16 Hacking 101 training! Attendees should have a brief understanding of TCP/IP networking and should be familiar with command lines on Linux systems. Also, being familiar with a programming/scripting language is considered useful.

 

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Jan/16

16

TelcoSecDay – First Round of Talks

Dear all,
This year the TelcoSecDay will take place on March 15th. For those of you who does not know about: the TelcoSecDay it is a sub-event of Troopers bringing together researchers, vendors and practitioners from the telecommunication / mobile security field.
(more…)

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Jan/16

16

32C3 Recap – Part 2

Hello everybody and welcome to the second part of our 32C3 recap!

In case you didn’t see the first part, make sure to check it out 😉
(more…)

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Jan/16

14

5th Round of TROOPERS16 Talks Accepted

Happy 2016 everyone! We are exactly 2 months away from the start of TROOPERS16!! Speakers and Trainers across the globe are polishing (or in some cases creating) their PowerPoints to use while delivering their highly technical and entertaining talks. While we here at TR HQ are busy tweaking orders, creating challenges to boggle the mind and test your skills, and of course working on some top secret fun. 😉

#BestWeekEver

Your TROOPERS Team

(more…)

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Hi,

today I’m going to suspend the “Developing an Enterprise IPv6 Security Strategy” series for a moment and discuss some other aspects of IPv6 deployment.
We’ve been involved in a number of IPv6 projects in large organizations in the past few years and in many of those there was a planning phase in which several documents were created (often these include a road map, an address concept/plan and a security concept).
Point is: at some point it’s getting real ;-), read: IPv6 is actually enabled on some systems. Pretty much all enterprise customers we know start(ed) their IPv6 deployment “at the perimeter”, enabling IPv6 (usually in dual-stack mode) on some systems/services facing the Internet and/or external parties.
Unfortunately there’s a number of (seemingly small) things that can go wrong in this phase and “little errors” made today are probably meant to stay for a long time (in German we have the nice phrase “Nichts ist so dauerhaft wie ein Provisorium”, and I’m sure people with an IT operations background will understand this even without a translator…).
In this post I will hence lay out some things to consider when you enable IPv6 on perimeter elements for the first time. (more…)

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Jan/16

8

32C3 Recap – Part1

Every year a group of us are happy to use the holidays to travel to Hamburg to meet other people and learn something new at the 32C3.

In this small series we’ll present you recaps of some talks we found most interesting, but you also should make sure to watch the recording of them. 😉

(more…)

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Jan/16

7

Another Perspective in Vulnerability Disclosure

As you know we (as in ERNW) are quite involved when it comes to vulnerability disclosure and we’ve tried to contribute to a discussion at several occasions, such as Reflections on Vulnerability Disclosure and ERNW Newsletter 50 Vulnerability Disclosure Reflections Case Study.

In this post I want to add (yet) another perspective, motivated by a disclosure procedure which just happened recently. (more…)

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