Some outright rants from a bunch of infosec practitioners.

TAG | conferences



Miner’s Canary Revival in IT Security


What is a Miner’s Canary?

Well, it’s a canary (these cute yellow songbirds some people have as a pet), and its main feature is that it dies before you will.

What the hack [pun intended]? And by the way… what has this to do with IT Security? Well… let me first quote Wikipedia on the birds:


, , , , , | Post your comment here.




Greetings everyone,

On Saturday last week I had the pleasure of delivering a workshop on IPv6 networking at the MRMCD2015 conference in Darmstadt, Germany. It goes without saying that the atmosphere was quite amicable; as usual at CCC-related events. What definitely impressed me the most was the diversity of the audience. There were around thirty attendees representing several age groups and all with seemingly differing backgrounds.


, | Post your comment here.




I recently had the pleasure to join the 64th NANOG (North American Network Operators’ Group) meeting in San Francisco, which can be understood as one of the largest Internet engineering conferences at all. It takes place three times a year at different locations in North America.

What I personally like about NANOG is its strong collaborative and cooperative character. It is not about single persons and also not too much about spectacular projects but more about discussing technologies, ideas, challenges and numbers. Every talk has a comparatively large time slot reserved for discussion, which is often more than fully used. Discussion is typically actively focused and is more time-consuming (and even more relevant) than the talk itself. Which often is intended by the community. The climate of discussion is almost always impressively polite and constructive, even for controversially discussed topics.


, , | Post your comment here.



ERNW @PHDays V in Moscow

Здравствуйте Insinuator Followers,

End of May eight ERNW members were travelling to Moscow (Russia) to visit the PHDays V conference. It was a very nice trip because we met a lot of gentle people, ate some great food and had quite some fun in this exciting and history-charged metropole, and we were able to get around using hands and feet (and Google translate ;-)).

The remainder of this post contains summaries of some of the most interesting talks at PHD V:


, , | Post your comment here.


I’m back from London where I gave a talk about security evaluation of proprietary network protocols. I had a great time at InfoSecurity Intelligent Defence and BSides London, many thanks for inviting me and giving me the opportunity to speak to so much nice people.

Find the abstract and the download link to the slides after the break.


, | Post your comment here.




Last week we enjoyed quite a wonderful HAXPO exhibition and HITB conference in Amsterdam. A number of great talks could be heard at the main HITB conference such as “Bootkit via SMS: 4G Access Level Security Assessment” or “Stegosploit: Hacking with Pictures“. And not only that: there were also several engaging hands-on workshops.

Apart from the main conference, there was the HAXPO – a hacker exhibition. At this exhibition you could connect with people from different companies, get a lot of merchandise, and also listen to several briefings on security and its philosophy. Fortunately, we had the pleasure to present two of these briefings and maybe you tested your web application skills at the ERNW booth.


, | Post your comment here.


We hope you are enjoying the ride as we continue our journey through IPv6. Below we have a great mix of talks, slides, and videos in this area posted below. We look forward to hosting more IPv6 (March 14th & 15th) talks next year at TROOPERS16!


, , , | Post your comment here.


5 2015


I attended this really nice conference in Slovenia on April 16th. It was a smaller conference, but very memorable for the people (students, IT sec professionals and managers alike) who attended.
I also had the pleasure to present on How secure am I with EMET? and Evaluating the APT armor and wanted to share the slides with you — feel free to approach me for any kind of feedback or discussion.

I’m looking forward to go to Ljubljana again! 😉


| Post your comment here.



SSL Tidbits at the BASTA.NET

A while a go Dominik and I gave an introductory presentation about SSL at the BASTA.NET conference, a developer-oriented event held in Darmstadt twice a year. At that time there were quite some enthusiastic participants but recently we’ve also gotten some inquiries asking for the relevant materials. Although there’s no recording of the session, we’ve decided to put the slides here for those interested who didn’t make it to the talk.

“Who should have a look at the slides?” you ask, well, if you’ve been wanting to get a sense for what the idea behind SSL is, where it is used, how it is usually leveraged and what problems could arise when poorly employed, you will certainly find the slide-deck interesting. Although the session was meant to slowly get participants up to speed in matters SSL, it’s still likely that more informed folks will still find it interesting, even if just as a refresher about key and certificate formats, PKI 101, SSL stripping, secure cookies, and other topics.

Without further, here’s slide deck.

For the hungry, here are some other interesting resources we suggested to attendees willing to go a bit deeper on the topic after the talk.

OWASP – SSL für Alle
OWASP – Transport Layer Protection Cheat Sheet
Mozilla – Server Side TLS

For those attending to the BASTA.NET next autumm, we’re looking forward to meeting you. But for the time being, that’s going to be pretty much it.

Thanks for reading and let us know what you think.

, | Post your comment here.



Protocol Properties & Attack Vectors

Next week, at DeepSec, we’re going to give a talk about Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD), a component of IPv6 which is realized by means of ICMPv6 messages. There are two versions of MLD (mainly specified in RFC 2710 and RFC 3810 respectively) and while MLD is technically implemented by ICMPv6 exchanges, these specifications describe a whole set of rules and communication formats, hence we can safely talk about “the MLD protocol”.

Now, you might ask: how does one tackle the task of examining the security “of a protocol”?


, , | Post your comment here.

Older posts >>


Mail | Twitter | Imprint

©2010-2013 ERNW GmbH
To top