Insinuator


Some outright rants from a bunch of infosec practitioners.

This is a guest post from Antonios Atlasis.

Last year, during the IPv6 Security Summit of Troopers 14 I had the pleasure to present publicly, for first time, my IPv6 Penetration Testing / Security Assessment framework called Chiron, while later, it was also presented at Brucon 14 as part of the 5×5 project. This year, I am returning back to the place where it all started, to the beautiful city of Heidelberg to give another workshop about Chiron at the IPv6 Security Summit of Troopers 15. But, is it just another workshop with the known Chiron features or has something changed?
I would say a lot :). The most significant enhancements are described below.

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Mar/15

3

Bug Hunting for the Man on the Street

This is a guest post from Vladimir Wolstencroft, to provide some details of his upcoming #TR15 talk.

What do you get when you combine a security appliance vendor, a bug bounty program, readily available virtualised machines, a lack of understanding of best security practices and broken crypto?
Ownage, a good story and maybe even that bounty…

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Today I gave a talk with said title in a private setting. Assuming the content might be of interest for some of you, we published the slides here.

As always we’re happy to receive comments or feedback.
Cheers

Enno

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Xen Logo

Developing a secure and feature rich hypervisor is no easy task. Recently, the open source Xen hypervisor was affected by two interesting vulnerabilities involving its x86 emulation code: XSA 110 and XSA 105. Both bugs show that the attack surface of hypervisors is often larger than expected. XSA 105 was originally reported by Andrei Lutas from BitDefender. The patch adds missing privilege checks to the emulation routines of several critical system instructions including LGDT and LIDT. The vulnerable code can be reached from unprivileged user code running inside hardware virtual machine (HVM) guests and can be used to escalate guest privileges. XSA 110 was reported by Jan Beulich from SUSE and concerns insufficient checks when emulating long jumps, calls or returns.

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We have pretty much finalized the agenda for the Troopers TelcoSecDay and here’s another cool talk (the others can be found here, here and here):

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Hi,

in addition to those recently announced and these, we’ve identified two more suitable talks for the TelcoSecDay ;-).

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Server operating systems with an OS, for which vendor support has ended, come with many risks that have to be considered and addressed. The primary goal should be always to decommission or migrate the majority of end-of-life (EoL) servers to OS versions, supported by the vendor. Here it should be noted that a migration to an up-to-date OS should be preferably done before your organization enters the end of life of that software ;-)

However, it must be considered that a number of servers cannot be migrated or shut down (easily) and must remain operational and accessible. Based on a customer project in 2014 we developed a high-level security concept for the secure operation of end-of-life Windows servers. We published this concept in our latest newsletter. You will find it here (https://www.ernw.de/download/newsletter/ERNW_Newsletter_47_Security_Concept_for_End-of-Life_Windows_Servers_signed.pdf)

 

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Feb/15

10

Troopers TelcoSecDay – Next Talks

Hi,

in addition to those recently announced we’ve identified two more suitable talks for the TelcoSecDay ;-)
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This is the sequel to the similar post on “IPv6-related Requirements for the Internet Uplink or MPLS Networks“. As mentioned there these requirements were created in the course of an RfP for network security services. The goal of this document was to provide a check list of IPv6-related requirements that security devices being part of the individual providers’ offerings have to fulfill in order to fully support the future IPv6 network.  (more…)

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At Troopers15 there will be another TelcoSecDay, like in the years before (2014, 2013, 2012). Here’s the first three talks (of overall 5-6):

Luca Bruno: Through the Looking-Glass, and What Eve Found There

Synopsis: Traditionally, network operators have provided some kind of public read-only access to their current view of the BGP routing table, by the means of a “looking glass”.
In this talk we inspect looking glass instances from a security point of view, showing many shortcomings and flaws which could let a malicious entity take control of critical devices connected to them. In particular, we will highlight how easy it is for a low-skilled attacker to gain access to core routers within multiple ISP infrastructures.

Markus Vervier: Borrowing Mobile Network Identities –  Just Because We Can

Synopsis: This talk features an attack that enables active cloning of mobile identities.
It is shown how to patch a baseband firmware for Android devices to implement a virtual SIM card. Additionally different methods enabling access to the SIM card on unmodified Android devices are presented. Running a mobile network authentication algorithm on a SIM card in a first device and forwarding the result to a patched baseband on a second device allows the second device to retrieve valid authentication tokens. The second device can use these tokens to authenticate to the mobile network without having permanent access to the SIM card.
This results in taking over mobile network identities of others as well as in possibilities to evade surveillance by rapidly changing network identities.

Bio: Markus Vervier is a security researcher from Germany. Having more than 10 years of experience in penetration testing, source code auditing and network security, he was involved in finding vulnerabilities in banking systems as well as operating system features such as BSD Securelevels.

 
Tobias Engel: Securing the SS7 Interconnect

Synopsis: Recent disclosures made public a reality long known to telco network operators: Once an attacker gains access to SS7, there are almost no barriers against spying on subscribers and committing billing fraud. sternraute is currently developing an SS7/MAP application level firewall to be deployed by operators. This talk will look at the different approaches our firewall employs to detect and filter illegitimate traffic and what operators can do beyond that to protect their customers and networks.

Bio: Tobias Engel, born in 1974, is founder and managing partner of Berlin-based sternraute GmbH, which develops security products for mobile networks. As an active member of Germany’s Chaos Computer Club,he repeatedly called attention to security vulnerabilities in ICTsystems. For many years, Engel has been a consultant and software developer for various companies in the IT and telecommunications sector.

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We’ll finalize the agenda in the upcoming days and publish details as for the other talks then, too. Stay tuned…
Have a good one

Enno

 

 

 

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